DBS V12 Volante Production Numbers – A Geek’s Guide

The DBS V12 coupe had been in production for over a year when the Volante version was first shown at the 2009 Geneva Motor Show. Whilst the coupe was a direct replacement for the Vanquish S, the DBS Volante represented a combination that AML had not offered for 10 years by putting their most powerful engine in their flagship open car. This isn’t something that AML always offer, but when they do the results are always spectacular and instantly desirable. Who can resist the pull of a DB4 convertible with the GT engine, the late 1980s overly bespoilered V8 Vantage Volante or the super-rare 1999 supercharged Vantage Volante Special Edition. So, the DBS V12 Volante is another shining example of this rare combination.

E11213 is a very famous DBS Volante. This particular car was used during the press launch and was famously driven by Jeremy Clarkson in Romania on a feature on BBC’s Top Gear. It is one of only eight UK cars with a manual gearbox – Photo by Tim Cottingham

Continue reading “DBS V12 Volante Production Numbers – A Geek’s Guide”

DBS Production Numbers – Which is rarest of them all?

DBS V12 Coupe

“So, just how many DBS V12 coupes were built with the manual transmission?”

It’s not unusual for people to ask the Registrars questions that we don’t know the answers to.  It’s also not unusual that we make a bit of an effort to find the answer.  On this occasion we actually had to go to an awful lot of effort and put in many hours of research, but in compiling the register of every DBS built, we have managed to answer so many more questions than just the total number of manuals built, and to uncover the truth about the most talked about car of the Gaydon Vertical Horizontal (VH) era. Continue reading “DBS Production Numbers – Which is rarest of them all?”

Hey Steve – Where are the articles?!

I haven’t posted as many “How To” fix it articles in the last few months (my apologies) but it was actually due to a deliberate strategy I had to try and spread the word about Aston1936.com and reach more readers/viewers.  Aston Martin DB9 owners are a global community, and there are only about 6,000 of us, so reaching everyone is a bit of a challenge.

When I learned that my first article was being published in Aston Martin Quarterly (AMQ) magazine that mentioned this Blog, I wanted to have something relevant for most ANY Aston owner to read wen they arrived, not a super specific article on how to change a DB9 marker lamp.   Broad appeal.   I also didn’t know exactly when the magazine would start to ship, and even then it’s a global publication and I would need to allow several weeks for it to make it to all corners of the world.

As you’ve probably seen (and are bored of by now), I put the “The True Costs of Owning an Aston Martin DB9” up as the primary article for almost two months.   I put a substantial amount of effort into that article, and in particular the Video on YouTube.   I actually included myself as a presenter (Jeremy Clarkson I am not), wrote a script, planned out the scenes, and drafted my neighbor Rob as a cameraman again.  About 20 hours of effort to produce the resulting 15 minute video.

Aston1936.com readership increasing

The results have been a pleasant surprise.   Readership of this blog definitely started to increase as the AMQ article hit the streets in late May.   In months prior about 50 people a day were visiting, and now its closer to 125.   In May over 9,000 articles were read.  I appreciate ALL of the readers taking the time to read my ramblings and hopefully getting some information to help them with their DB9 project.

YouTube Statistics

The YouTube video on the True Costs has been the real surprise.  Most of my videos get viewed maybe 200-300 times (which I think is great), probably by actual DB9 owners tackling the maintenance task I am describing.  But, as of today, the True Costs video has been viewed nearly half a million times!  The video has been watched for over 2.6 million minutes (that’s over five years of minutes)!   Great for the ego to be sure.  [Maybe it was discovered as a cure for insomnia]  What was also interesting was the 100’s of comments left by viewers (and some foul mouth trolls), 99% of which were constructive and positive.   Nearly 3,000 people are subscribed to the Aston1936 YouTube Channel now.  Won’t they be surprised when my upcoming PCV Valve videos get posted next.  I suspect my Subscriber count is doomed to dwindle.

But, the AMQ edition has fully circulated around the world now, and my brush with YouTube fame is waning, so its time to get back to the business of this Blog, helping others learn how to look after their own DB9’s.  I am going to try and get back into the habit of publishing an article per week.

I have a slate of articles I am getting ready in the weeks ahead (where the repair work is already completed along with filming), and they will include:

  • Sad man with Cracked Windshield

    Changing your PCV Valves (the final bits of the series)

  • What is costs to fix a cracked Windshield (including a time lapse video of the repair)
  • Removing/installing all the Leather Dash Panels
  • Removing/installing the Rear View Mirror
  • Removing/Installing the Headliner
  • Repairing a sagging headliner
  • Leveling the GPS cover on the Ski Slope of the Dash
  • Repairing the leather end cap on the drivers door
  • Snow Foaming your DB9

Also in the works for the future I have a few articles I am gearing up to under take:

  • A Brake Job – new Pads, Rotors, Caliper Bolts and Wear Sensors
  • Getting new tires – what the options are, differences, etc.  Bridgestone (OEM) vs. Michelin vs. Pirelli.
  • How to change every light on the car, and while I am at it change over to LED bulbs (including links to buy the bulbs online).
  • Changing the door/wing mirrors to the newer, improved design that was included on later models (that experience less wind noise).   The black plastic base on mine are starting to look like crap.
  • How to touch up small chips in the paint (the paint on these cars is weak and prone to chipping).

If anyone out there is interested in sponsoring the parts for some of these projects, please reach out and leave a comment.

If you are interested in these upcoming articles please leave me a comment below, it might help me prioritize the order I get them released in.

Thanks for reading!

Aston Martin Quarterly Magazine

If you are a registered member of the Aston Martin Owners Club (the AMOC) you receive a few magazines each year.

  • The small “Aston Martin News” guide with the latest from the various AMOC chapters around the world and other articles about news and events
  • The “Vantage Point” magazine that includes feature sized articles
  • and finally “Aston Martin Quarterly” (AMQ) the glossy coffee table style magazine.  Published four times per year, it contains technical articles, historical items, factory news and reports of Club activity from around the world. The Quarterly is a full color publication of, on average, 80 pages.

Astons on the Web

Back in December 2016 I suggested to AMQ the idea of putting in a series of articles about information on the Internet about Aston Martins.  My experience so far with this blog (and others like it on the Internet) is that once the owners ‘discover it’ they are very grateful that the resources exist.  Maybe AMQ would be willing to help get the word out pointing at some of these sites. Continue reading “Aston Martin Quarterly Magazine”