Thank You!

I wanted to take a moment to thank all of you out there, the readers of this website.   There is an overwhelming positive feedback that comes from you in comments on articles, YouTube videos and via the Contact page.  I try to respond when I can.   I always love to see pics of your cars and hear about your own repair adventures.

I’d like to send out a special thanks to Michael Crowther that was kind enough to buy me a Whiskey.   Mike used the ‘Donate’ page on the site and got me a bottle of MacAllan 18.   Yum!   Although Mike wasn’t here to share a dram with me, it was a good chance for me to also thank my cameraman Rob.

 

About 400 viewers a day are accessing the website now – just wow!   I’m glad some of the information is helpful.  I know I go way too deep into details for some, but I make videos and articles for myself first, and I want to see exactly how to do something, not some vague recollection of what was involved.  I make it for me, and share it with all of you.

Equally amazing is the YouTube channel (check it out here is you haven’t already).   My most popular video on The True Costs of an Aston Martin DB9 has nearly reached 1 million views.  Wow!   More people consume Aston1936 content on YouTube than on this website.   I think they compliment each other, so I’ll be continuing to do projects in both formats.

I also would like to thank the guest authors that have taken the time to contribute their own articles to this website [Truly – thank you guys].   I’ve managed to rope in a handful of like minded Aston owners that usually write me separately about their projects and my hope is to coax them and more of you into helping share the knowledge.  If you’d like to share an idea, large or small, just contact me.

I also work at an IT firm full time and we’ve been going non-stop during the Covid crisis (essential service).  Worrying about the firm, our staff, and all those responsibilities have sidelined some of my hobby time.  When I do get a few free minutes, I am stressed out a bit, so the MacAllan 18 was well timed.

What’s ahead?  I have a ton of backlogged content.   I waffle between sitting down at the computer and doing the hours of post production work for stuff already ‘in the can’, and the longing to just get into the shop on new projects (many of which I have parts staged).   Upcoming new works include:

  • The final results of my quest for more Horsepower.  The results are in…..
  • Automatic Transmission Fluid change (many are asking for this article)
  • Completion of the Brake Service series
  • Power Steering Fluid change
  • Coolant change
  • All about the magic AMDS dealer computer (I managed to purchase one ;>)
  • and a lot more….

Please keep sending feedback.  It keeps me going.

Stay safe!

Steve

Installing an Oil Catch Can in a V12 Aston Martin Rapide or DB9

Oil in the Throttle Body Area is a Sign of PCV Failure

Last November I was replacing the coil packs and spark plugs on my 2011 Rapide and the oil in the inlet manifolds and throttle bodies made it pretty clear that my PCV valves were past their best.

I decided to replace the PCV valves with these £15.98 metal ones from i6 Automotive (check it out here) in Sheffield, England.  But since it would take them a few weeks to get to me here in Adelaide, South Australia I set to thinking. On my diesel 4wd one of the first modifications you do is to fit a catch can into the PCV system.  Good ones are incredibly effective at removing the oil mist and preventing it being recycled through your engine.

After quite a lot of Googling, I came across this kit for the v8 vantage offered by Redpants.lol (check it out here), but couldn’t find anything suitable for the V12.  So with the PCV harness already in pieces to refit the valves I started fiddling… Continue reading “Installing an Oil Catch Can in a V12 Aston Martin Rapide or DB9”

Aston Martin DB9 – Sheared Bolt Repair

Every now and then you will come across an existing sheared bolt or you will shear one yourself, either way they have to be repaired. Sometimes (rarely) there might be a length of bolt or stud proud enough to be able to get a grip of it with mole grips or self tightening pipe wrench. If you try to get a stud out this way be sure to soak it thoroughly with a good penetrating oil for as long as you can first and work the bolt backwards and forwards to loosen it don’t try to undo it in one direction straight away you have to “persuade” it out.

The sheared bolt on my Aston’s slam panel was where it bolts to the bonnet release catch. The shear is about 3mm below the top of the steel of the catch and is quite a common failure. It’s quite easy to over tighten and shear smaller sized bolts particularly when using ratchets or spanners with handles/lengths that are up to 200-250mm (8-10″) long. One trick is to hold the spanner in the middle of its length to reduce the lever arm if tightening up smaller bolts. On more critical bolts use a torque wrench, most torque figures are given in manuals so use them. The overriding requirement is common sense, are you bolting up a bit of light weight “slam panel” as in the case above or a major suspension part !!!

The worse situation is the sheared stud or bolt that shears below the surface of the steel and it’s the most common. There is a reason why car manufacturers say you should use new bolts in critical areas and it’s not just to make money out of us. Bolts that are located in areas of high stress, high temperatures or exposed to potentially rusty locations will experience changes to their mechanical properties over time. Corrosion can reduce the surface condition of bolts not to mention the “eating away” and “pitting” of the threaded area. The pitting can eat into the steel causing areas of potential weakness that will fail under the load of tightening. Bolts that are exposed to the effects of heat (heating up then cooling down) such as engine/cylinder head bolts or exhaust bolts and that are under load for a long period will not exhibit the same mechanical properties once removed and then reused. Hence manufacturers recommend replacing all the cylinder head bolts once they have been removed which often seems a little extravagant as they always look fine but as I’ve explained it’s not done without good reason.

There are two options to repair a sheared bolt. If possible it may be extracted by drilling a hole down through the centre of the bolt and using a stud extractor. These extractors are readily available but I have to say I haven’t had much success with them. The extractors have a left hand thread so as they are screwed into a drilled hole in the sheared bolt or stud they tighten in the direction that will unscrew the sheared bolt.

Stud Extractors

I always try to extract a bolt but usually end up drilling it out and re-tapping the hole. The size of the sheared bolt or stud determines the size of the hole to be drilled and tapped here are some common drilling sizes for tapped holes that you might come across when working on your Aston.

As you will see there are a number of different Pitches for “Fine” bolts so it is important to select the correct drilling size particularly if you are having to drill out a cylinder head bolt for example, you only get one chance at it. To ensure you are using the correct size drill you can measure the size of the replacement bolt you are going to fit using a thread gauge.

Available in the UK from as little as £5.00

When you drill out the sheared bolt consider where the swarf (waste) will fall. If there are critical items around such as say the alternator it will not react nicely to having small metal pieces dropped into it so protect vulnerable areas with cloth covers etc..

Swarf from drilling the hole ready for tapping

If the swarf can be easily vacuumed up then covering everything up is not an issue.

Once the old bolt has been drilled out you can now start to tap a new thread for your replacement bolt. When tapping out a hole it is important not to try to rush the job by driving the tap down into the hole. You will almost certainly shear the tap in the hole then you really do have a problem as the tap is made of extremely hard steel that you will find impossible to drill out. Since taps are made from particularly hard steel that brings with it an inherent brittleness so don’t go mad trying to cut the new thread in one go.

The technique is to apply downward pressure to get the tap started whilst turning the tap half a rotation (180deg) clockwise then reversing the tap direction for a quarter of a turn (90deg). This is repeated for the whole of the tapping process until the full depth of the hole has been tapped. The small rotation backwards allows cut material to release into the grooves of the tap so that the tap does not bind in the hole and potentially break. Once the tap has cut a thread of a few millimetres you will no longer require to apply downward pressure as the tap will use the thread it as cut to provide the downward force into the hole. During the cutting you should use a light oil or grease to aid the cutting process, WD40 is a good lubricant for this. It is also advisable to remove the tap completely periodically to clean away swarf.

Use a lubricant and stop periodically to remove swarf

The key is to take your time, you’re not on the production line at Ford, if you are doing this job it’s probably a one off, so there’s no need to rush.

Check the bolt in the new tapped hole when finished

When you have finished tapping the hole and have cleared away all the swarf check that the replacement bolt will run down nicely into the new tapped hole. You don’t want to get into the assembly of everything to find for some reason the replacement bolt you are going to use is too tight or too slack in the hole.

Remember the key is take your time and start off by marking the centre of the broken bolt with a good centre punch mark so your drill will not wander off the centre of the bolt and drill squarely down the bolt. You don’t have to drill out the hole to the final tapping size in one go, it’s often better to drill out in say up to three stages to arrive at the final size. If you follow these instructions you should be able to replace a sheared bolt on your Aston with no problem.

There is a short video here showing the drilling out and tapping of the sheared bolt on my Aston’s bonnet catch.

Mike (Aston 2209)

Third Hand for Undertray Removal and Installation

When you’re working under the Aston just about every job seems to require you to remove the undertray or underpan. This is a large sheet of Aluminium approximately 1500mm long x 800mm wide. In itself it’s not heavy but due to its size it is very cumbersome to handle.

Undertrays

As those who have removed the undertray will know you seem to be undoing bolts for ages (about 36 in total, I kid you not !!!)  before you can get it down/out. If you are doing an oil change there is a hole directly below the engine drain plug but I would defy anyone to get that plug out without the oil running all over the undertray. I don’t see the point of the hole as you have to remove the undertray to change the oil filter anyway, unless you do it from the top as Steve has done finding it almost impossible to remove the filter from below on a LHD Aston.  I can confirm that on a RHD Aston it is relatively easy to change the oil filter from below.

Undertray hanging vertically under the Aston

When I first started removing and replacing the undertray I had to get my wife to hold the back end whilst I removed the final bolts then we could lower it together to the floor. Since just about every job under the car requires this taking off I decided I had to come up with another way of doing it and hence the “Third Hand” was created. When I stopped to think about it the answer was simple in the end … the best ideas are always the simplest.

Hook the string over exhaust bolts
Pieces of wood pass through air flow fins

The “Third Hand” couldn’t be simpler, a piece of strong nylon string and two pieces wood. As you lift up the front end of the undertray the rear hangs from the exhaust bolts allowing you to feed the front end of the undertray over the lip of the front valance and insert bolts to secure it in place.

With the undertray bolted in position at the front the next stage is to insert the central bolt through to the main cross-member. Once this is in place the “Third Hand” can be removed and the rest of the bolts fitted.

Here is a short video showing how this works in practice.

Mike (Aston 2209)