Reinstalling the Leather Door Cap End Cap in an Aston Martin DB9

Plunk.  Awww Crap!

End Cap showing 2 layers of old tape

Yet another tale of woe begins with my DB9.  One day when I rolled into the garage and parked, I opened my door, and then heard a faint “Plunk”.  Anyone that’s owned a British Car before knows that you need to get out and look around for what’s fallen off.  Sitting right there on my garage floor was a neat little do-dad wrapped in leather.   I quick look back up and at the car revealed that it had fallen off the end of the drivers door cap.   This little cap is designed as a finisher to hide one of the door card mounting screws.  It was held on by some double sided tape that gave up (much like the glue in my sagging headliner – read about that here).   Its an easy fix that anyone can undertake, and here’s how I did it. Continue reading “Reinstalling the Leather Door Cap End Cap in an Aston Martin DB9”

Everything about Servicing the Brakes on an Aston Martin DB9 or Vantage

We all relish in the V12 sound and power of the DB9, but equally important (to our lives) is the ability to haul the nearly 2 tons (3,968 pounds or 1800 Kgs) to a halt.  The DB9 is equipped with some of the best brakes in the industry, and the good news is that servicing them is much the same as working on any average car.   You can take your car to an Aston Martin dealership or really any competent brake shop to get the work done, but at a price to be sure.  I would suggest that you can just as effectively service most any aspect of your brake system yourself as long as you have a modicum of mechanic skills.   In this article and those to follow I plan on taking you through how to inspect your brakes and do a full service if necessary. Continue reading “Everything about Servicing the Brakes on an Aston Martin DB9 or Vantage”

Aston Martin DB9 (2004 – 2008) Battery Cable Safety Recall Action RA-18-0026

Aston Martin has initiated a recall of about 1,953 DB9’s and DBS’s from model years 2004 through 2008 that were sold in the United States.  In just the right combination of unlikely circumstances the right side seat (passenger side) can impinge on the main battery feed cable, possibly wearing it out and could cause a short potentially leading to a fire.  My DB9 happens to be one of the cars caught up in the recall, so I thought I would take the time to share what I’ve learned.

“Unlikely”, “Can”, “Possibly”, “Could”, “Potentially”.  It’s really unlikely it would happen to your car, but the mere fact it could means you should follow up and get your car fixed to maintain its value (and your personal safety). Continue reading “Aston Martin DB9 (2004 – 2008) Battery Cable Safety Recall Action RA-18-0026”

Getting and Installing New Tires on your Aston Martin DB9

It doesn’t matter if your DB9 is a daily driver, track day star or a garage queen, eventually you’ll have to change your tires.  They will either wear out or get too old and become unsafe.  I use my car as a daily driver, and after about 4 years, 15,000 miles and 4 track days it was time to replace them.

Which Tires?

I did my research about my replacement tire options, and I’ve written that up in another article where I share what I learned (I suggest you check it out here).  In summary I decided to get a set of Michelin Pilot Sport 4S in the original sizes.  This article covers what I did after that decision. Continue reading “Getting and Installing New Tires on your Aston Martin DB9”

Tire Options for an Aston Martin DB9

The tires on your DB9 will need replaced eventually.  You either put enough miles on them that they wear out, or if they get old enough the rubber breaks down and it becomes a safety issue.  I’ve written a bunch about tire before, including how to inspect them for wear or age (check out the article here).

When the time comes to replace them, the question usually arises “with what”.  A few pieces of good news here.  We have options and they aren’t insanely expensive.

Worn out Bridgestone

I’ve changed the tires twice on my 2005 DB9 so far.  When I purchased the car in 2013 it still had the original factory shipped Bridgestone with a 2004 date code, they were 9 years old and cracking.  I replaced them with a new set of the same Bridgestone tires.   Fast forward 15,000 miles and 4 years and I’d worn those out, and figured I’d try a set of the Michelin Pilot Sport 4S.

When I looked into the options, here is what I learned…. Continue reading “Tire Options for an Aston Martin DB9”

Installing the Passenger Side Instrument Dash Panels in an Aston Martin DB9 or DBS

If you’ve taken out your passenger side instrument dash panels in your DB9 (check out my article on how to do this) you were probably dealing with one of a few possible problems:

Whatever your challenge, once the panels are ready to put back in you want to do it right.  This article will cover the details about getting them back into position properly. Continue reading “Installing the Passenger Side Instrument Dash Panels in an Aston Martin DB9 or DBS”

Installing the Driver Side Instrument Dash Panels in an Aston Martin DB9 or DBS

If you’ve taken out your drivers side instrument dash panels in your DB9 (check out my article on how to do this) you were probably dealing with one of a few possible problems:

Whatever your challenge, once the panels are ready to put back in you want to do it right.  This article will cover the details about getting them back into position properly. Continue reading “Installing the Driver Side Instrument Dash Panels in an Aston Martin DB9 or DBS”

Installing the A Pillar Interior Trim Cover (Cant Rail) in an Aston Martin DB9 or DBS

In my previous article I explained how to carefully remove the A Pillar Interior Trim Cover (a.k.a. the Cant Rail) from a DB9.  I was doing this as part of the process to repair the sagging headliner.  With my headliner repaired and reinstalled, it’s now time to put the A Pillar Covers back in place. Continue reading “Installing the A Pillar Interior Trim Cover (Cant Rail) in an Aston Martin DB9 or DBS”

Repairing a Damaged Dash Instrument Panel in and Aston Martin DB9 or DBS

When I removed the lower drivers side dash instrument panel I discovered that two of the snap-in connectors were broken off (probably thanks to the DPO – Damn Previous Owner).  I was taking the panel off while I was working on repairing the Sagging Headliner in my car (read all about it in this series of articles).

The broken connectors are a white plastic item, glued to the smooth back of the panel, and covered with a metal spring clip.  They are designed to insert into a mating socket on the dash structure, and grip and hold the panel tight.   When I removed the panel I noticed the clips were sheared off (missing) but immediately found them still stuck in the mating socket.  I used a pair of needle nose pliers to gently tug the snapped off clip out of the socket without damaging it further. Continue reading “Repairing a Damaged Dash Instrument Panel in and Aston Martin DB9 or DBS”