How to Install the Airbox in an Aston Martin DB9

I had to remove the airbox from my DB9 to replace the Front Position Lamp Bulb that had burned out (Check out that article and video here).   I’ve already shown you how to remove it in a previous article, and in this one I will show you how to reinstall it. Installing the airbox isn’t hard, and can be done with just a few basic tools. Continue reading “How to Install the Airbox in an Aston Martin DB9”

How to Remove the Airbox from an Aston Martin DB9

You may need to remove the airbox from your DB9 (or Vantage) to get to some other component that is buried in behind it.   In my case, I needed to reach the Position Lamp Bulb which had failed and is located in the deepest, darkest reaches of the inner fender area well-hidden above the airbox (check out my other video on how to change this).   Removing the airbox isn’t hard, and can be done with just a few basic tools. Continue reading “How to Remove the Airbox from an Aston Martin DB9”

Parts needed for a Full Brake Service of an Aston Martin DB9

If you drive your DB9 (or Vantage) regularly eventually you will need to service the brakes.  I started the process for my car by writing up an article about all the details of the braking system (read it here).   In another article I’ve covered the details of how to inspect your brakes to check if the pads, rotors, calipers and wear sensors are in good condition (read it here).  Based on that inspection if you’ve found that you only need to change your brake pads, I’ve created a separate article just covering that (read it here).  If you need to change more than you pads, then this article is next up for you.   I wanted to cover the parts and supplies you should round up before you do a Full Brake Service. Continue reading “Parts needed for a Full Brake Service of an Aston Martin DB9”

Seasonal Tire Pressure Warning in an Aston Martin DB9

First cool day of Fall

When I start my DB9 on the first cold day every fall it greets me with a scary “Check Tires” tire warning alert on the instrument cluster.  In frustration and alarm about all I can think is “Now what!”.  As it turns out this hasn’t been a big deal.

When the ambient air temperature falls, air gets denser.   Consequently, this causes the air pressure in a cold tire to drop slightly.  In our DB9’s, if the pressure drops below 30 psi the alert will trip the Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TMPS) to warn you of a potential issue.  A small pressure change isn’t the end of the world, but we need to follow up.   You can learn more about the TPMS system and what will cause an alarm in my more detailed article here.

I check the pressure in my DB9’s tires a few times each year, and when I set them in the summer the ambient air temp is usually 85+ degrees.  In the fall where I live (Northern California) the ambient temperature can drop to below 40 degrees, a 45+ degree change.  This appears to be enough of a change to trip the alert each fall.

Really bad photo in the dark (sorry) of the TPMS status lights in the trunk. The red LED is solid while the rest are blinking.

The next logical step is to get out of the car, open the trunk and look at the brains of Tire Pressure Warning system mounted along the top.   There are five (5) colored LEDs on the device, and you should discover at least one lit up solid and the rest blinking.  The one that is on solid is the one with a pressure problem.   In this occurrence on my car it was the Red LED that was solid (meaning the left front tire had an issue).  Each color corresponds to a specific wheel (that’s that those little colored bands are around the tire valve stem).  They are:

  • Yellow – Left Rear
  • Red – Left Front
  • Green – Right Front
  • Blue – Right Rear

[Note:  My car is a 2005, and later model cars may have a more integrated TPMS system, or even just tell you which tire is low and its pressure.  Early model owners need to follow this more manual approach].

Once you know which tire is alerting, grab your tire pressure gauge and check the pressure of that wheel (you can check out my other article on how to do this).   If its below 30 psi, you can confirm this is the problem tire.   Personally, I would recommend you check all four tires while you are at it since the others will likely be close to the same issue.

The solution now is to top up your tire pressures.   If you have your own compressor just add air to reach the ideal pressure of 36 psi in the fronts and 38 psi in the rears.  If you don’t have a compressor, and the tire is just down a couple of PSI, you can still drive safely to the nearest gas station and top of your pressure there.

Once you’ve topped up the pressure back to normal, the alert should clear.   You may need to turn off the car completely and start up again for the TPMS to recognize the issue is resolved and clear the alert on the instrument cluster.

Warning:  If you top up the air and the problem returns quickly on the same wheel, this is likely not because the outside air temp has dropped and you may have a puncture in the tire.   Time to take the car to a tire repair specialist immediately.   Don’t drive on a tire if the pressure is below 20 psi.  Don’t drive very fast or very far either or you risk damaging the core of the tire and it will need replaced (at significant expense since they have to be done in pairs).  And I wouldn’t use the can of tire repair ‘Goo’ in the toolkit of the Aston unless I was desperately stranded roadside.  That Goo may solve the problem temporarily, but you’ll be messing up the inside of the tire, the TPMS and the wheel rim.  My tires have been ‘Screwed’ a few times, check out this article.


Video

Here is a quick video of the experience I recorded on one of those days….

 

Changing the Front Position Lamp Bulb in an Aston Martin DB9

I hadn’t even noticed that my DB9 had one of these until a reader of this blog asked me how to change it out.   In each headlight cluster there is a small ‘Position Lamp’ that is always on when the lights are on.  You can see it here in this picture.  If you peer through the glass when the lights are off, you’ll notice the bulb is actually BLUE, even though when it’s on it appears mostly white.  Like any bulb they can burn out, and eventually one of mine did.   Is it the end of the world?  No, but one you notice it all I can think of is that it’s a one eyed pirate.   Changing this bulb isn’t trivial.   As you can see it’s right at the very front most area of the headlight pod and there is no easy access to it.   As you will learn in this article, it’s 99% prep getting to it, and 1% changing it.  Read on to learn how. Continue reading “Changing the Front Position Lamp Bulb in an Aston Martin DB9”

How to Replace the Wheel Center Caps in an Aston Martin DB9

Rolling along slow in or out of the garage I could hear a quite ‘Rattle – Rattle – Rattle’ in my DB9.  Not like a loose nut and bolt, but a quieter shuffling rattle.  While I was washing the car one day I finally found the source – the Wheel Center Cap on one rim was loose, and could flop around making the noise.

Epoxy Repair to back of tabs. Yes, that is a Ford logo on there too.

The center caps are a beautiful painted piece with the Aston Martin wings on them, but they are still just made out of plastic.  They just press/snap fit into the center hole of each wheel.  13 years in the California sun and heat takes its toll, and the fingers on the back of the caps weren’t springy any more.  Each time the tires have to be changed they need to be removed, so that’s at least two or three times.  Worse yet, I eventually discovered the one in question had been damaged, and a quick fix with some epoxy employed to hold the cracked tabs in place.  DPO (damn previous owner).

Changing them is a pretty simple task, and here’s how to do it. Continue reading “How to Replace the Wheel Center Caps in an Aston Martin DB9”

Inspecting the Sway Bar/Anti-Roll Bar Bushings in an Aston Martin DB9

Part of both the 1 year and 2 year annual service routines for your DB9 should be inspecting the suspension components.  The rubber bushings that hold the sway bar (a.k.a. anti-roll bar or stabilizer bar) in place can begin to wear out, and when they do your handling over bumps and in the corners can degrade.  Checking the bushings is easy enough once you have access. Continue reading “Inspecting the Sway Bar/Anti-Roll Bar Bushings in an Aston Martin DB9”

Changing the Rear Sway Bar / Anti-Roll Bar Bushings in an Aston Martin DB9

If you’ve inspected your rear sway bar / anti-roll bar bushings in your DB9 and discovered they need changing (click here to learn how), this article is for you.  The good new is that the process is pretty simple once you have access to them, but take note below of the special tightening procedure.  Read on to learn how. Continue reading “Changing the Rear Sway Bar / Anti-Roll Bar Bushings in an Aston Martin DB9”

Changing the Front Sway Bar / Anti-Roll Bar Bushings in an Aston Martin DB9

In another article I have already written about my pursuit to find and repair a “Creak-Squeak” from the front suspension of my DB9 that was driving me nuts.  During the investigation of that issue (which ultimately required changing the Front Upper Control Arms), I wanted to be sure the squeak wasn’t coming from my front sway bar (anti-roll bar) bushing.  If you’ve inspected your bushings (click here to learn how) and they need changed, this article is for you.  The good new is that the process is pretty simple once you have access to them, but take note below of the special tightening procedure.  Read on to learn how. Continue reading “Changing the Front Sway Bar / Anti-Roll Bar Bushings in an Aston Martin DB9”

Aston Martin V12 Engine Cylinder Numbering

There are 12 cylinders in the V12 under the hood of my 2005 Aston Martin DB9, but I couldn’t find any reference to tell me which cylinder was number 1, and which was number 12.   Does it criss-cross left to right, right to left, or something else?  I scoured the official Aston Martin Workshop Manual – nothing (which is just plain dumb since they reference cylinder numbers within the manual).  I asked on the usual online forums and got a variety of kind guesses from a few people trying to help, and at the same time heard a chorus of people asking the same question.  You know me, this set me on a mission to find out! Continue reading “Aston Martin V12 Engine Cylinder Numbering”