Rear Subframe Surface Rust Descaling in an Aston Martin DB9

Some of you may have seen one of my (@aston2209) previous Blog on changing the rear lower wishbone assembly and at the time I commented on the condition of the rear subframe. It had quite a lot of flaky surface rust that was both unsightly and could lead to more aggressive corrosion in later life for Aston 2209. At the time I wanted to undertake cleaning up the subframe but since it was in the winter and there was a lot of damp atmosphere from day to day, I decided to leave it until the summer. However here we are in May and we have just gone through a really long period of dry weather with warm temperatures and seeing as we are also in “lockdown” due to the Coronavirus it seemed like a good time to do the job. Continue reading “Rear Subframe Surface Rust Descaling in an Aston Martin DB9”

Dyno Testing Results After Installing a Airbox Delete Kit in an Aston Martin DB9

Airbox Delete Kit Installed

I am in the process of evaluating several ‘bolt on’ performance changes for my DB9.  Ultimately I am hoping to achieve power levels similar to a DBS (they are essentially just the same engine).  In this article I am testing the changes that come with fitting a Velocity AP GT4 Airbox Delete Kit (check out my other article on how to fit one).  This is a popular modification that promises less weight and better breathing to make more power.  Its that last claim we are testing here. Continue reading “Dyno Testing Results After Installing a Airbox Delete Kit in an Aston Martin DB9”

Dyno Testing a Stock Aston Martin DB9

How much power does my 2005 Aston Martin DB9 really make?   It certainly makes ‘enough’ – the car is not lacking for performance.  Lately I’ve been curious about a few ‘bolt on’ performance upgrades that I want to try out.  To know if they make any difference, I want to know the actual power my car make now that its 15 years old and has 44,000 miles on it.   I need a Baseline performance test. Continue reading “Dyno Testing a Stock Aston Martin DB9”

Installing an AML Performance Secondary CAT Delete Kit in an Aston Martin DB9

If you are a member of any of the Aston Martin Owners FaceBook Group or online Forums (like PistonHeads or 6SpeedOnline) you will likely have seen some chatter talking about fitting a ‘Secondary Cat Delete Kit’ (SCDK) in your car to increase the power and improve the sound.  It’s not like the stock DB9 has a deficiency in either department already, but its promise is a simple change will give you more of each.  Intrigued by this I couldn’t resist researching how to tackle this.

There are several vendors that make SCDKs, and in this article I will be covering my personal experience with the kit from AML PerformanceAML Performance is a small company in the UK, and I met its parts manager Mark Holden in the Aston Martin Owners Facebook Group.   He is a DB9 owner himself.  Mark suggested I might want to try out a set of their SCDKs and I took him up on the offer.   Read on to learn about their kit and how to fit it. Continue reading “Installing an AML Performance Secondary CAT Delete Kit in an Aston Martin DB9”

Dyno Testing Results After Installing a Secondary CAT Delete Kits in an Aston Martin DB9

Secondary CAT Delete Kit Installed

Power is like chocolate.  You could always use more even though you don’t need it.   I’ve been evaluating several ‘bolt on’ performance changes for my DB9, ultimately hoping to achieve power levels similar to a DBS (they are essentially just the same engine).  In this article I am testing the changes that come with fitting a Secondary CAT Delete Kit (SCDK or decat).  This is a popular modification that promises less weight, better sound and more performance.  Its that last claim we are testing here. Continue reading “Dyno Testing Results After Installing a Secondary CAT Delete Kits in an Aston Martin DB9”

Exhaust Sound Change after Installing a Secondary CAT Delete Kit in an Aston Martin DB9

Secondary CAT in an Aston Martin DB9

I’ve been fiddling with my DB9 trying out several ‘Bolt On’ performance improvements.  One of them is a ‘Secondary Catalytic Converter Delete Kit’ (SCDK) which promises to:

  • Reduce weight (it does by about 8 pounds)
  • Increase Power (yet to be seen- Dyno test coming soon)
  • Improve the Sound

This article is all about the sound, and how it changes. Continue reading “Exhaust Sound Change after Installing a Secondary CAT Delete Kit in an Aston Martin DB9”

Will an Aston Martin DB9 Pass California Emissions Testing After Installing a Secondary CAT Delete Kit?

Secondary Catalytic Converter

If you’ve been following this Blog recently you know I’ve been interested in testing several bolt on performance upgrades for my DB9.  One of those upgrades was a Secondary Cat Delete Kit (SCDK).   You can learn about how I installed it by checking out my other article here.   I wanted to learn if my car would still pass a stringent California Emissions SMOG test with an SCDK fitted.  Read on to find out if it did. Continue reading “Will an Aston Martin DB9 Pass California Emissions Testing After Installing a Secondary CAT Delete Kit?”

Installing the Shear Panel in an Aston Martin DB9

In a previous article I discussed how to remove the chassis stiffening ‘Shear Panel’ from my DB9 (read about it here).   I was removing it to access the exhaust system hidden above it while I was tackling installation of a Secondary Cat Delete kit (read more about that here).  Reinstalling the panel is the last step of the process, and it’s important to get it right so your DB9’s structural rigidity is restored.  Here is how I did it. Continue reading “Installing the Shear Panel in an Aston Martin DB9”

Installing a Velocity AP Secondary CAT Delete Kit in an Aston Martin DB9

If you are a member of any of the Aston Martin Owners FaceBook Group or online Forums (like PistonHeads or 6SpeedOnline) you will likely have seen some chatter talking about fitting a ‘Secondary Cat Delete Kit’ (SCDK) in your car to increase the power and improve the sound.  It’s not like the stock DB9 has a deficiency in either department already, but its promise is a simple change will give you more of each.  Intrigued by this I couldn’t resist researching how to tackle this.

There are several vendors that make SCDKs, and in this article I will be covering my experience with the kit from Velocity AP.  Velocity AP is a great company steered by Stuart Dickinson.   They started in the UK, and moved their facilities to British Columbia, Canada a few years back.  They make all their products in house.   Read on to learn about their kit and how to fit it. Continue reading “Installing a Velocity AP Secondary CAT Delete Kit in an Aston Martin DB9”

Don’t slam your DB9’s Bootie – Changing the Boot Lid Gas Strut on an Aston Martin DB9

Ever since I bought Aston 2209 the boot has effectively closed under free fall. We have of course learnt to be careful with it, but after a couple of frighteners where we have dropped it and it has slammed shut I decided for the small amount of money involved it was crazy not to resolve the problem. The potential for breaking the rear glass really exists. The boot lid is supported on gas struts that are part of the hinge assembly but once the gas has started to leak away they loose their effectiveness. Even when you have removed an old gas strut you will find it very hard to depress so you might think there is nothing wrong with it. Unfortunately there is, so bite the bullet and buy a couple of new ones. Continue reading “Don’t slam your DB9’s Bootie – Changing the Boot Lid Gas Strut on an Aston Martin DB9”